Preditors & Editors Readers’ Poll for Misfit Stories

The Preditors & Editors™ Readers’ Poll is now live and includes an anthology, The Society of Misfit Stories, Volume One, which I covered in a previous blog post here. The anthology includes my 10,000 word horror novelette, The Squirming, Scarlet Madness.

So if you’d like, please take a moment to vote in the poll. You’ll need to visit the anthology page, include your email address, and then verify your vote through email authentication. Feel free to vote in the other categories as well.

P&E is run by critters.org, a science fiction and fantasy online workshop that I have been a member of for years and highly recommend, particularly for intermediate-stage authors approaching your first publication or with a few short stories already available. The group can also critique novel-length works, although they will receive less feedback for obvious reasons.

 

Misfit Stories, Vol. 1 Now in Paperback

The Society of Misfit Stories from Bards & Sages Publishing

Bards and Sages Publishing has released The Society of Misfit Stories, Volume One, in a handsome paperback edition.  This story includes my own novelette, The Squirming, Scarlet Madness, a bit of alternate universe horror.

According to the blurb:

The Society of Misfit Stories Presents this eclectic collection of unique novelettes and novellas from some of the most unique voices in the speculative genres. This diverse anthology offers readers an enticing assortment of high fantasy, alien adventure, paranormal investigations, haunts both real and imagined, and more.

The volume contains twenty stories and more than 330 printed pages, so that’s a considerable amount of story to enjoy. The full Amazon description can be viewed here.

As the electronic rights have now reverted to me, I expect to release an electronic edition on Amazon early next year.

Due to the way the beginning of the story is formatted (made to resemble a legal document in a few small ways), I’ve included a small excerpt here as a graphic rather than text. Hopefully, it’s legible:

Ride the Star Wind Out Now

Ride the Star Wind, an anthology of Lovecraft-themed space opera, is now available from Broken Eye Books in paperback and hardback format. I received my hardback copy recently and it’s gorgeous, from the lush cover to the rich array of professional illustrations inside. It was particularly exciting to see the illustration for my story.

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Ride the Star Wind by Broken Eye Books

My story in the anthology is called “The Eater of Stars” and it’s about 6,000 words of space opera set in the same Astral Diadem setting as my other stories. The attempt here was to create a contrast between an imaginable humanoid high-tech/magitek civilization and the further unknown: a species of alien beings significantly more advanced than the humanoid civilization. Along those lines, it uses a device from The Shadow Out of Time, among others.

The viewpoint character Chydi is a diplomatic attache for a mid-level interplanetary state called Brakandy. She’s posted at the Circlet, which is the hub of an interstellar federation called the Association, ruled somewhat loosely by a benevolent AI known as Governing Intelligence.

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Chydi flees a Gi Pawn. No pushing on the travelators!

Her backstory, while not obviously relevant to the main storyline, allowed for some fun point of view shifts during the course of the story related to gender articles.

The accompanying illustration by Mike Dubisch (to the right) is gorgeous and captures what I hope is a frenetic and exciting opening to the tale. We see Chydi in her pajamas running and pushing up a travelator (a moving sidewalk) within the interior of the Circlet, desperate to reach Governing Intelligence to warn it about an impending disaster.

The Circlet is a well-ordered society however, and pushing is not allowed. The robot in the background is a Gi Pawn, an encapsulation of the Circlet’s overriding AI which enforces local laws.

The collection is also available as an ebook on Amazon.comhere. It’s a fantastic anthology overall with great stories and high production values.

Ride the Star Wind on Kickstarter

Last week, my story “The Eater of Stars” was accepted by the anthology Ride the Star Wind. This is exciting as it should qualify as my second SFWA sale, along with the story coming soon to Escape Pod.

Ride the Star Wind: Where Space Opera Meets Cosmic Horror is a Cthulhu-themed space opera anthology from Broken Eye Books. Here’s a description from the anthology call:

Send us into space, away from earth, and bring the weird! Give us adventure and wonder, spaceships and monsters, tentacles and insanity, determined struggle and starborne terror…

We want diverse stories with modern sensibilities from many different voices that show the immense and diverging possibilities ahead for weird horror…

For mixing elements of space opera and cosmic weird horror, the short story “Boojum” by Elizabeth Bear and Sarah Monette is a great touchstone…

You can read the full call here.

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Ride the Star Wind from Broken Eye Press

The anthology also has a (successful) Kickstarter project to fund interior artwork to go with the vivid, full color cover. The project just minutes ago made its first stretch goal where it will physical 3×5 illustrations to all backers.

A second stretch goal will be a free audiobook of the entire anthology,  so by no means is it too late to become a backer and get your hardcover edition. Be sure to check out the Kickstarter.

My story uses the same setting as most of my other stories. Cosmic entities have been part of the backstory of that universe since the start, although Lovecraftean themes aren’t the primary driver behind the world-building.

Let’s not give the plot away, but the story has a couple abrupt, ninety-degree turns and perspective shifts that fit its themes of self and other, the unknown and the unknowable. As a tease, here’s the invented epigraph from the beginning of the story:

“Who’s afraid of science? The word means only knowledge. Science is the light of the mind. It is magic you should dread, that boundless infinite beyond all understanding and the instruments of our reason. Fear not the unknown but the unknowable.”

– The Book That Never Sleeps

Faster Than Death in Shattered Space

Sounds like a long, cool title but it’s actually two names in one: “Faster Than Death” is a short story I wrote that’s out now in the Shattered Space anthology. Available from Tacitus Publishing, this anthology collects short stories featuring science fiction and horror and is available through Amazon. It’s also included in the Kindle Unlimited program, meaning you can read it for free if you’re a KU subscriber.

The following blurb accompanies the collection:

The concept of traveling through space and visiting outlandish planets has always fascinated humankind. But what if these journeys to the outer reaches are not so pleasant? What horrors, whether alien or imagined, would we find? Once there, what new challenges will we face as technology progresses beyond soci

ally acceptable behaviors and what we perceive as ‘human nature’? Shattered Space showcases a collection of short stories written by gifted authors that touch on some of the possible answers.

My story is set in the Astral Diadem setting used for most of my stories and oddly enough, it ties into the story “Beetle-Cleaned Skulls” that will be broadcast on Escape Pod in a couple of months, albeit in a loose and tangential way. One doesn’t need to read one story to follow the other, or vice versa.

The illustration accompanying this post is part of the anthology, which includes a black and white line drawing with each story created by the multi-talented editor, James S. Austin. In this case, we’re seeing Raku’s eyes covered with a black glass, one of the key visual elements in the story.

Other stories in the collection are written by C.R. Galarza, David F. Gray, Colin Hinckley, Gregory L. Norris, Daniel Rosen, Josh Shiben, T.S. Kummelman, Brett Parker, and the editor, James S. Austin. A great bunch of stories they are too, and a huge thanks to Tacitus Publishing for including my piece and giving it a home.